North Carolina: Winston-Salem City Councilor honors Juneteenth

For the mayor of Winston-Salem, Pro Tem DD Adams, the historic decision to mark June 19 as an official holiday in the city has been anchored in the heart of his being by his great-grandmother. Adams’s great-grandmother was a female slave who lived to be 115 and was able to tell her 9-year-old granddaughter of the day she learned of her freedom. “She was 17 when the slaves were free in South Carolina,” Adams said. “She talked about the way they ran out of the fields. She talked about the time they ran on the dirt roads, crying, screaming uncontrollably.” Adams felt a huge responsibility at this young age to be an agent of change for his ancestors. “She left me with that (like) a 9 year old girl in second grade, not knowing that I would be sitting here today in the role I now play as elected in Winston-Salem, in spending the June 17 vacation in the city, to recognize her freedom and that of other African American slaves at that time, “Adams said. Adams said she knew to get the votes to officially declare June 19 holiday, the past should resurface. ”I knew I had to convince some of this, but I knew most would come with me once they heard the story of why and what Winston-Salem had done with the redlining and tearing apart communities to build highways because they said it would promote economic development for businesses and jobs. But what he did was destroy the African American communities of Winston-Salem and destroy thousands of homes that were never rebuilt even though they were promised. We built Hig Highway 52 that separated east from west, and all of this created racial tensions and a misunderstanding of our city. (He) created poverty and scourge. (It) created segregation and re-segregation of our schools, all of it, ”Adams said. Adams’ work resonated with city leaders and was approved. The City of Winston-Salem is also sponsoring a variety of events as part of a Juneteenth Celebration with Triad Cultural Arts this weekend at Biotech Place and Bailey Park in the Winston-Salem Innovation District. Members of the community can also experience parts of the festival virtually on the Triad Cultural Arts Facebook page and YouTube channel. Click here for more information on the event.

For the mayor of Winston-Salem, Pro Tem DD Adams, the historic decision to mark June 19 as an official holiday in the city has been anchored in the heart of his being by his great-grandmother.

Adams’s great-grandmother was a female slave who lived to be 115 and was able to tell her 9-year-old granddaughter of the day she learned of her freedom.

“She was 17 when the slaves were free in South Carolina,” Adams said. “She talked about the way they ran out of the fields. She talked about the time they ran on the dirt roads, crying, screaming uncontrollably.”

Adams felt a huge responsibility at this young age to be an agent of change for his ancestors.

“She left me with that (like) a 9 year old girl in second year, not knowing that I would be sitting here today in the role that I am now as an elected official in Winston-Salem, soldier. of a vacation Juneteenth in the city, to recognize his freedom and other African-American slaves at that time, ”Adams said.

Adams said she knew that in order to get the votes to officially declare June 19 as a public holiday, the past would have to resurface.

“I knew I had to convince some of this, but I knew most would go with me once they heard the story of why and what Winston-Salem had done with redlining and tearing up communities to build communities. highways because they said it would spur businesses and jobs economic development. But what he did was destroy African-American communities in Winston-Salem, and destroyed thousands of homes that were never rebuilt even though they had been promised. We built Highway 52 that separated east from west, and all of this created racial tensions and a misunderstanding of our city. (It) created the poverty and scourge. (It) created segregation and re-segregation of our schools, all of it, ”Adams said.

Adams’ work resonated with city leaders and was approved.

The town of Winston Salem Also sponsoring a variety of events as part of a Juneteenth celebration with Triad Cultural Arts this weekend at Biotech Place and Bailey Park in the Winston-Salem Innovation District.

Members of the community can also virtually experience parts of the festival on the Triad Cultural Arts Facebook page and YouTube channel.

Click here for more information on the event.


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